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History of the infantry regiments we portray

34th Georgia Infantry Regiment

This information can be found in a Familypedia article on the unit at http://familypedia.wikia.com/wiki/34th_Georgia_Infantry_Regiment.

Unit History

The 34th Georgia Infantry Regiment served in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. The unit was organized in May of 1862, at Camp McDonald, near Marietta, Georgia. It recruited members from Bartow, Cherokee, Floyd, Polk, Cobb, Paulding, Carroll, Haralson, and Jackson Counties.

Early in the war, the unit was sent to Tennessee, and then to Mississippi, where it was assigned to T.H. Taylor's Brigade, Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana. There it participated in the battle at Champion's Hill.

The unit also participated in the defense of Vicksburg, enduring the hardships of the siege and battle until they were captured upon surrender of the city to General Grant on July 4, 1863. Not wanting to be burdened with the management of 30,000 sick and starving prisoners, General Grant paroled the survivors. After parole, the regiment was reorganized and placed in General Cummings' Brigade, in the CSA Army of Tennessee.

Later in the war, the 34th Georgia was active in many engagements in Tennessee and Georgia during the Chattanooga Campaign and the Atlanta Campaign, and ultimately ended the war in North Carolina. The regiment included 369 men and 266 arms in December, 1863, and had 219 fit for duty in January, 1865. Very few surrendered in April.

Duty Roster

The Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Database lists 1874 men on its roster for this unit. Actual unit enrollment was about 660. NPS Roster.

Primary Roster Data Source: Georgia, and Lillian Henderson. 1959. Roster of the Confederate soldiers of Georgia, 1861-1865. Hapeville, Ga: Longina & Porter. WorldCat FHL Collection HATHI TRUST Digital Library

Men usually enlisted in a company that was recruited from their home county, but not always, and units were sometimes combined after battles when their numbers were severely reduced by casualties. For these reasons, it can be difficult to find out which company your ancestor served in. When in doubt, first look at the company which recruited in his home county.

Regimental Officers

The field commanders were Colonel J.A.W. Johnson, Lieutenant Colonel J.W. Bradley, and Majors Thomas T. Dorough and John M. Jackson. To find names of officers, non-commissioned officers, and staff, see Roster page 763.

Company Rosters

Company A - ("Fitzgerald Rifles") Whitefield County - Roster page 764.
Company B - Cherokee County - Roster page 773.
Company C - Coweta and Troup Counties - Roster page 778.
Company D - Chattooga County - Roster page 786.
Company E - ("Jackson Farmers") Jackson County - Roster page 793.
Company F - Dade County - Roster page 802.
Company G - Emanuel County - Roster page 81
Company H - Banks County - Roster page 821.
Company I - ("Flintville Greys") Franklin County - Roster page 829.
Company K - Carroll and Heard Counties - Roster page 837.

References

  • Beginning United States Civil War Research gives steps for finding information about a Civil War soldier. It covers the major records that should be used. Additional records are described in "Georgia in the Civil War" and "United States Civil War, 1861 to 1865" (see below).
  • National Park Service, The Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Database, is searchable by a soldier's name and state. It contains basic facts about soldiers on both sides of the Civil War, a list of regiments, descriptions of significant battles, sources of the information, and suggestions for where to find additional information.
  • Georgia in the Civil War describes many Confederate and Union sources, specifically for Georgia, and how to find them. These include compiled service records, pension records, rosters, cemetery records, Internet databases, published books, etc.
  • United States Civil War, 1861 to 1865 describes and explains United States and Confederate States records, rather than state records, and how to find them. These include veterans’ censuses, compiled service records, pension records, rosters, cemetery records, Internet databases, published books, etc.
  • Lillian Hendersen, comp., Roster of the Confederate Soldiers of Georgia, 1861-65, six volumes, is a published roster of Georgia Confederate soldiers who served in the infantry. (Hapeville, Georgia: Longino and Porter, 1960-64); FHL book 975.8 M22h; on 3 films 1033660 items 3-4, 1033661, and 1033662 and FHL microfiche 6082336.
  • Sutton, E. H. Civil War stories. (Bethesda, Maryland : University Publications of America, c1990), FHL fiche 6082370
  • NPS History - 34th Georgia
  • Family History Research on the 34th Georgia

6th Regiment, Kentucky Volunteer Infantry

This information was found at a Familysearch article on the unit at https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/6th_Regiment,_Kentucky_Infantry_(Union) and at http://6thkentuckyus.yolasite.com. Other references are listed below.

 

Unit History

The 6th Kentucky Infantry was organized at Camp Sigel, Jefferson County, Kentucky, in December, 1861, under Colonel Walter C. Whitaker, and was mustered into the United States service on the 24th December, 1861.

The 6th Kentucky served in the Army of the Ohio, later the Army of the Cumberland. The regiment was at Perryville, and although its division did not participate in the battle, but were among those who pursued General Braxton Bragg's Confederate army as he withdrew from Kentucky in the aftermath of the battle. After Whitaker’s promotion to General, Colonel George T. Shackelford took command.

The Regiment fought with distinction at Shiloh, Stones River, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Resaca, and other engagements in the Chattanooga and Atlanta campaigns. They mustered out at Nashville, Tennessee on the 2nd day of November, 1864.  By the end of the war, their numbers had been reduced by casualty, death, illness, and capture, from over 900 to around 400 men.

Duty Roster

The Civil War Soldiers and Sailors database lists 1,363 men on its roster for this unit.

Men usually enlisted in a company that was recruited from their home county, but not always, and units were sometimes combined after battles when their numbers were severely reduced by casualties. For these reasons, it can be difficult to find out which company your ancestor served in. When in doubt, first look at the company which recruited in his home county.

Regimental Officers

The field commanders included Colonel Walter C. Whitaker, Colonel George T. Shackelford, Lieutenant Colonel Richard C. Rockingham, Major Richard T. Whitaker, Capt. Isaac N. Johnston, and Lt. Col. Richard C. Dawkins. To find names of officers, non-commissioned officers, and staff, see Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Kentucky Vol. 1-1861-1866, page 718.

Company Rosters

Company A - Camp Joe Holt, Clark County, Indiana - Roster page 720.
Company B - Shepherdsville, Bullitt County, Kentucky - Roster page 722.
Company C - Camp Joe Holt, Clark County, Indiana - Roster page 724.
Company D - Shepherdsville, Bullitt County and Camp Sigel in Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky - Roster page 728.
Company E - Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky - Roster page 730.
Company F - Camp Sigel in Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky - Roster page 734.
Company G - Camp Sigel in Louisville, Jefferson County, Ketucky - Roster page 736.
Company H - Camp Sigel in Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky - Roster page 740.
Company I - Camp Sigel in Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky - Roster page 742.
Company K - Camp Sigel in Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky - Roster page 744.

References

  • Beginning United States Civil War Research gives steps for finding information about a Civil War soldier. It covers the major records that should be used. Additional records are described in ‘Kentucky in the Civil War’ and ‘United States Civil War, 1861 to 1865’.
  • National Park Service, The Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Database, is searchable by soldier's name and state. It contains basic facts about soldiers on both sides of the Civil War, a list of regiments, descriptions of significant battles, sources of the information, and suggestions for where to find additional information. 
  • Kentucky in the Civil War describes many Confederate and Union sources, specifically for Kentucky, and how to find them.. These include compiled service records, pension records, rosters, cemetery records, Internet databases, published books, etc.
  • United States Civil War, 1861 to 1865 describes and explains United States and Confederate States records, rather than state records, and how to find them. These include veterans’ censuses, compiled service records, pension records, rosters, cemetery records, Internet databases, published books, etc.
  • Reinhart, Joseph R. A History of the 6th Kentucky Volunteer Infantry U.S.: The Boys Who Feared No Noise. Louisville, Ky.: Beargrass Press, 2000. FHL Book 976.9 M2re.
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